VIOLENCE AGAINST MUSLIM WOMEN IN NORTH EASTERN NIGERIA; IN SEARCH OF PEACE-BUILDING STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK
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Keywords

Violence
Muslim
Women
Peace
Building
Nigeria

How to Cite

MOHAMMED AMIN UMAR. (2018). VIOLENCE AGAINST MUSLIM WOMEN IN NORTH EASTERN NIGERIA; IN SEARCH OF PEACE-BUILDING STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK. Unimaid Journal of Public Law, 5(2), 141 - 163. Retrieved from http://journals.unimaid.edu.ng/index.php/unimaid-journal-of-public-law/article/view/91

Abstract

The monumental violence against Nigerian women was the dragnet abduction of 276 female students by the BOKO HARAM insurgents in North-Eastern Nigeria, that they were slaves and would be sold at the slave market; some were found and rescued while others still missing to date. This ugly incident occurred within the confined of a public school, despite international outcry this mystery is still unresolved, and the gloom and doom which surround the missing female student’s saga have attracted global condemnation and commitment towards partnering Nigeria for their rescue, but these sentiments are yet not translated into concrete action. This paper is a theoretical investigation of the scale of violence that afflicted Muslim Women as a result of Boko Haram’s violent extremism in North-Eastern Nigeria. The paper is divided into four parts; Part one will trace and appraise the conceptual framework of peace-building strategy and determine its relevance to women-specific needs. Part two will interrogate the concept of human safety and security as a vital component part of the peace-building strategy. Part three will examine the jurisprudential interpretations of the concept of slavery under Islamic law to determine whether abducted female students will be properly referred to as slaves. Part four will focus the analysis on what role if any should the OIC play in the rescue of the abducted students. This paper found that Nigeria has failed in the discharge of its due diligence obligations and finally some recommendations will be proffered.

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