Towards Linguistic Analysis of Hate Speeches in Electronic Communications and their Implications to National Security in Contemporary Nigeria
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Keywords

Hate Speech
National Security
Proficiency

How to Cite

Asabe Sadiya Mohammed, & Alhaji Abubakar. (2018). Towards Linguistic Analysis of Hate Speeches in Electronic Communications and their Implications to National Security in Contemporary Nigeria. Liwuram - Journal for the Humanities, 19(1), 79 - 90. Retrieved from http://journals.unimaid.edu.ng/index.php/liwuram/article/view/49

Abstract

Conflicts and insecurity in the 21st century have drawn the attention of the world. Fragile situations have arisen because of the social conflicts that exist and are often deepened by the use of hate speeches. This study collated some social media chats and On-line reports that are considered as security challenges and analysed their grammatical structures. It discovered that some of the speeches were deliberately made to provoke hate while some others were erroneously committed as a result of poor proficiency in the language of communication. It further discovered that some of the speeches committed as a result of low proficiency can also be divided into two on the basis of errors that include wrong selection of appropriate lexical items, improper use of idiomatic expressions, ambiguity or receptive errors. The research is first approached through opinion sampling, where texts considered by the researchers as hate speeches were collated and distributed to fifty respondents who determined them as either instance of positive or negative speeches. Out of these, 70 were considered hateful with 30 not hateful. These were further examined linguistically and the findings revealed that 79% of those considered hate speeches were grammatically correct and therefore intentional, while 21% were results of linguistic inadequacies because the writers deviated from the standard rules of the English grammar. In some others, the statements were grammatical but there were some errors of reception, where the respondents could not decode the message properly, thereby giving wrong responses. The implication of this is that as a result of those errors, the write ups were ambiguous and often distorted messages were sent to the readers, which in turn distorted the whole communication. And which subsequently made the end results issues of contention that brought about exchange of opinions and insults that threaten National security. The study concludes that whatever form hate speech takes, it is both a linguistic and social issue which must be tackled.

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